A Glance At The Past, & A View Of The Future
Jan 2012 13

Wow, time certainly flies and I can’t believe 2011 is now history. Well, it was a memorable year, one that helped me find focus on cycling again, after a great finish to 2010. We recently posted short blogs by Renaissance Man & Masher with their Goals for 2012, but we have yet to publish the Goals for RAM Cycling, until now.

First, let’s reflect on the awesome happenings by RAM Cycling in 2011, then we can take a look at where the road leads for 2012 and beyond. Some simple, but important events accomplished by Renaissance & Masher in ’11:

*   First century ride of the year (first ever for Renaissance Man) was the “Wheels O’ Fire” in Hamilton County, Georgia on April 2, 2011

*   The idea of RAM Cycling first came to light on a Renaissance & Masher shared spring break vacation at Jacksonville Beach, FL during the week following that 1st century ride

*   Our second century ride of the year was “Horsey Hundred” in Georgetown, KY on Memorial Day weekend 2011

*   RAM Cycling was officially launched on the world wide web & twitter around the start of July 2011, we are claiming 4th of July as our Birthday

*   Renaissance & Masher cycled in the sunshine state some more on vacation at Panama City Beach in July

*   The months of August and September saw RAM put in miles and miles in prep for GABRAKY

*   RAM Cycling rode in GABRAKY 2011 in October, a 3 day cycling event that travels around Kentucky (this was our second consecutive year, and included our 3rd century of the year)

*   RAM Cycling closed out 2011 moderately by posting several hundred more miles before rolling into 2012

Now that we have reflected on the recent past, RAM Cycling can only move forward by setting some Goals, just like Renaissance & Masher did personally. The good news is, RAM is a reality, and here are some of the goals we hope to achieve this year or in the very near future:

***   Bring excellent news and memories from our charity and group ride events to life right here at the RAM Cycling website

***   Fight to have legislation introduced and passed into Kentucky Law to raise awareness and safety for bicycling, including a 3-FEET TO PASS LAW, more bike lanes, more Share The Road signs on roadways, more local bicycling events for the public & more

***   Gain corporate backing of some close partners, in order to help support our push for legislative updates and help us promote a more healthy and bicycle friendly America, and also help us support  local charity groups that host events we intend to ride in this year and in years to come

***   RAM Cycling intends to host it’s own bicycle ride event, however the details are still in the planning phase for time of year, course, total miles, and location (expect this to be 1st class when it happens!)

***   Design and purchase our own cycling jersey to wear at events to help promote RAM Cycling, and t-shirts to give away

***   Obviously, we intend to support Renaissance & Masher in all of their bicycling endeavors

***   We want to develop a free membership club for the purpose of distributing important cycling information and legislative updates through a monthly newsletter

***   Finally, we will be excited to publish all of the good news we can find and relate to regarding bicycling

Thanks for visiting RAMCycling.com We hope you will continue to visit throughout 2012, as we try to accomplish our mission. So far it has been a wonderful ride, but it’s a journey that we are glad you are sharing with us. PLEASE feel free to leave a comment on any post we publish, or send us an email at any time. Your feed back is important to us and helps us improve our site for you. You can also follow us on Twitter @RAMCycling. Here’s to a great year in 2012!

Redbud Ride Review 2012
Apr 2012 30

RAM Cycling recently completed the Redbud Ride in London, KY. This was the 5th anniversary of this cycling event in southeastern Kentucky. Tim, the Renaissance Man, and Kevin, the Masher, both had been training since the start of 2012 for this and several other century rides that are on the wish list. We have done a pretty good job of taking advantage of the mild and moderate winter weather, and building our base for a busy cycling season.

Leading up to Redbud, all the talk with locals that had previously done it, and all the social media talk was positive and complimentary info. After having completed it, I have nothing but good things to say. I’m not personally a Facebook user, but on the night before the ride, I read some of the posts by others on Renaissance Man’s page regarding the Redbud Ride. I was anxious, with this being my first century of the season, and the thought of how bad the weather could turn out to be, I didn’t sleep very well at all.

Our ride started out by meeting Jim Simes from South Carolina for the first time in person. We have communicated via Twitter this year and he surprised me when I sent out a random tweet inviting followers to join us at Redbud or Horsey Hundred, by replying “see you at Redbud!” I’m also looking forward to meeting another twitter friend Adam Crowe from Kentucky at the Horsey 100. It was an honor to ride with Jim, who happens to have ridden over ten thousand miles in about a year while losing over 80 pounds! He destroyed us on the climbs and eventually pulled away and finished well before RAM Cycling.  I gave Jim a bottle of KY Bourbon after the ride to take home as a souvenir from our great state, and he commented “The Redbud 2012 will be one to go down in books as a ride to remember.”

He’s absolutely right, and the following review of the 2012 Redbud is my random thoughts from a great ride, definitely one to remember! We pulled out of the London Farmers Market around 8am on the Red Route (100 miler), and the sky was gray, the air was cool, and we knew moisture was on the way. Around the 10 mile mark the 4 routes became 2 as the 25 & 50 milers turned right, while the 75 & 100 mile routes went left up our first climb. At that point, I was uncomfortably cool, but rapidly warmed up. This climb separated Jim, Tim & I for a while. Then came rain … it was a drizzle, then steady, and then it poured. I caught back up to Jim at a turn, where he stopped to put on some rain gear. We tried to talk, but it was more important to watch the road at this point, considering the heavy rains and unknown roads. He kept moving as we arrived at the first rest stop, but I was ready to stop for a moment. A few minutes later, Tim arrived saying, “Are you kidding me? This is crazy.” I played it off smooth by responding, “What do you mean?”

Inside, I was freezing cold, as I chose not to carry rain gear (extra weight in my mind at the start), but I saw frustration in his eyes, and knew he needed some motivation to pick him up. He had an abnormal work week leading up to Redbud having to work over 40 hours in a couple days as his company made some equipment changes at one of the mines they own, and now with the weather set in, he chose to continue on the 75 mile route. So I pushed off immediately, to try not to finish too far behind him. Still raining, I ventured through the beautiful Daniel Boone National Forest over some rugged terrain and difficult pavement that I know was complicated by the weather. My second stop was along the Rockcastle River with a local group playing true KY Bluegrass music in a gazebo! I spoke to several riders and volunteers, and then set back out following a guy from the area that actually told me we would pass by his house on the route. We reconnected with the 75-mile route, crossed a wooden bridge where we had to get off and walk across.  Then I slowed to check on a tandem couple off the bike. The husband said “we are just taking some pictures” and the wife said, “We are not yet ready to turn right here.” I soon found out why, as I turned right myself and read the message on the pavement “Gear Down Baby!”

I had arrived at the infamous Tussey Hill, a climb that actually has its own Facebook page. Uhm yeah, I knew I was in for a work out immediately because it is one of those hills where it turns out of site from the bottom, so you don’t know what lies around the bend until you get there. As I made it up to the first turn it slowly tapered off with another bend ahead. Just as I made it through that sweep and caught my breath, the road went up. Straight up. I saw a sign near the top of this section, then I put my head down and just mashed the pedals and mashed until I could read the sign. It said “Congrats: 22% Grade!” As the road slowly began to flatten out again, I was struggling to catch my breath, and doggone it; we had more to go up. Up, up and away, I finally reached the summit, and know the toughest part of the ride was behind me. Shortly after peaking Tussey Hill, I arrived at my next stop.

Pulled pork BBQ sandwiches, and snacks, and beverages. I warmed up, refueled (regretfully, I passed on the BBQ), and headed back out behind a good friend from Frankfort that I ran into at the break. After a mile or so, I caught and passed him up, only to have him blow by me on a steep winding descent, the pay back from Tussey, but now with the rain steady again, I was timid. Moments later, I heard what sounded like “On your left” being screamed, and sure enough, a crazy female cyclist hauled past me, her bike was doing the wobble as she negotiated the slippery wet sweeps on the downhill. We all came together at the bottom, and I gave her props (I just knew I was going to witness a bad accident, glad I was wrong). They all turned off, as the red route forged straight, I spent the next 15-20 miles in deep thought, with soreness starting to set in on my legs, thanks to Tussey. Next stop was the official lunch stop, where I had a piece of Papa John’s pizza, and took twenty minutes or so to warm up. One of the volunteers approached me as I pulled in and asks, “Are you the Masher?” Stunned and surprised I answered, “Yes sir,” then he informed me that the Renaissance Man waited on me for a while at this stop, but went on and headed back out. It was nice to know he was doing well, since my phone battery had died.

Before I left the stop I ask an elderly gentleman cyclist if this was the last stop for the red route. He said “no, there’s one more at a turn, and then you hit a steep climb immediately after that.” I though to myself, how steep can it be? Surely my thoughts of steep were considerably different than his idea. I mounted up and took off feeling strong still, passing several riders. I did stop at the last stop, only to use the restroom, the caught another group of guys at the base of the elder’s “steep climb.” I felt pretty stupid about half way up it, when it took all my energy just to keep pushing the pedals. Near what I hoped to be the top, painted on the pavement was “20% Baby!” I told the guys in front of me “I hope that doesn’t mean where only 20% of the way up.” The elder cyclist spoke the truth, and the last 10 miles were tough as I was beginning to wear down both physically and mentally, I recall passing a family (a couple with several teen girls) all on mountain bikes, then I pulled back into town and strolled into the finish, very excited to be greeted by Tim the Renaissance Man along with his wife Kelly, and my lovely wife Maria just before 4pm!

What a feeling of accomplishment I had by completing the Redbud Ride, considering the rain, cold, breezy weather. I never once had a close call with a vehicle.  I didn’t even get honked or yelled at. The ride was very well organized, with plenty of up front info leading up to the ride, SAG was awesome, I witnessed numerous vehicles on all sections of the route, all the turns were well marked, all the volunteers were very pleasant and overly friendly. The only disappointment I can report is that I didn’t get to see any of the beautiful Redbuds along the route, but that’s due to the fact that half the miles or more that I rode were behind rain drop covered glasses.

In closing, I am glad that I was able to ride in the 2012 Redbud Ride in London, KY. I would give the overall ride an A rating, and will highly recommend it to cyclist to try for 2013! Thanks Redbud, for a ride that will never be forgotten.

Stay tuned for more cycling event reviews coming in May. Tentatively on the upcoming schedule are Gran Fondo Louisville, and Horsey Hundred in Georgetown, KY! For questions or comments regarding RAM Cycling info, please feel free to contact us in the tab on the right hand column of this page.

*Masher

 

New Year! New Season Just Around The Corner
Jan 2013 05

Wow, it’s hard to believe it’s already a new year, 2013! Time truly flies, it seems like only yesterday we were finishing with George at the “Gran Fondo Hincapie.” I went into this off-season with a head of steam from that great final group ride event, and have begun to train for the upcoming season that will be upon us before we know it. It is awesome to think that we have already passed the winter solstice and already the days will slowly begin to gradually shed more and more daylight. It is also a little scary to think about how soon the first century ride of the new season will be here, followed by what I hope to be my most challenging month ever in May.

 

What I Learned In 2012

End the season with a great group ride event as late as possible! It definitely helped keep me motivated to work hard going into the off-season, rather than just hang the bike up and get lazy for a couple of months. I came home from a very tough ride in the Blue Ridge foothills craving more, and it has translated to putting in work for this next season. I definitely plan to find another tough ride to tackle near late October, early November.

I’m putting GABRAKY back on the schedule. That is one ride I truly missed last year, that I have done frequently in the past. I wouldn’t dare trade the fall vacation I had with my wife from last year, because it was spot-on, but I will make my plans around that ride this year. I know averaging around 60 miles per day doesn’t sound like a whole lot towards the end of the season, but when you do it for 4 consecutive days over the rural bluegrass landscape of Kentucky’s back roads, it is challenging enough to give you a real sense of accomplishment and I’m always ready for that finish line. Not to mention the cycling camaraderie that is felt by the passionate cyclists I have met on GABRAKY. See you in the fall!

Maybe the most important lesson I learned from last year is to make plans for June and July. As I reflect on my riding from 2012, I notice a big fall off in rides and miles in the middle of the summer. This year I will find rides in those months to keep my cycling stamina strong throughout. I will also utilize a great cycling tip for the busy dad that came to me from my good friend Chris “Schmidty” Schmidt (a.k.a. the Big Dog): when my children play games on the weekends, I should ride my bike to the county where they play and then meet up with the family; and if parents have to go separate directions with children, just simply take your bike with you and ride in between games. Great tip, Schmidty, now I can be a multi-tasker like my wonderful wife. No more excuses.

 

On The Slate For 2013:

Slate is a great term for my proposed ride schedule for 2013, it should also be somewhat colorful and tough just like the rock. I definitely plan to continue what I started in ’12 by riding with my local club (Bluegrass Cycling Club) out of the Georgetown location on Tuesday nights, along with some of our varying local group rides on the weekends. As far as organized events, here’s what I am thinking for now, of coarse, always subject to change, but I’m confident that I will complete the century routes at these great venues:

1. Redbud Ride in London, KY on April 13

http://www.redbudride.com/

2. 3 State-3 Mountain Challenge in Chatanooga, TN on May 4

http://www.chattbike.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&layout=blog&id=14&Itemid=38

3. Assault On Mt. Mitchell in Spartanburg, NC on May 20

http://www.freewheelers.info/assaults/

4. Horsey Hundred in Georgetown, KY on May 26

http://www.bgcycling.org/index.php/rides-mainmenu-95/horsey-hundred-mainmenu-71

5. Preservation Pedal in Frankfort, KY on June 22

http://www.preservationkentucky.org/pages.php?id=6

6. Old Kentucky Home Tour in Louisville, KY on September 7

http://www.louisvillebicycleclub.org/Default.aspx?pageId=997552

7. GABRAKY across the state of Kentucky in early-mid October

http://www.gabraky.com/

 

I also plan to get some good rides in down in the south central heart of the bluegrass with Schmidty and some of the Lindsey Wilson College crew. There is an outside shot that I may tackle the RAIN Ride (Ride Across Indiana), but it will depend on summer vacation and my summer work schedule before I will commit. I would love to do another ride or two or more in other states as well, but it will have to depend on timing and investment, I do this as a recreational hobby. Please feel free to send us your favorite ride and I will attempt to get there and ride in it, then publish my official review!

You can also send us your thoughts or comments about various rides via Twitter, and consider following our journey: @RAMCycling

Cheers to a safe, happy, and healthy new year with plenty of cycling in 2013!

*Masher

Feb 2013 14

Thoroughbred-Farm-at-Rice-Rd. horsey hundred 2                   Kentucky 2011 016 horsey hundred

I began to ride a road bike in the summer of 2006, and it became a passion immediately after completing my first big ride event, GABRAKY (Grand Autumn Bicycle Ride Across Kentucky). I was instantly referred to as “ate up” by my cycling friends, and I liked it. At that time I was not familiar with “The Horsey Hundred,” a century ride hosted in my hometown every year on Memorial Day weekend by the Bluegrass Cycling Club, but it was the talk of all the local cyclists as the season came to a close that first year. “You should join us for the Horsey next May,” my close friend Ed Stodola and plenty others told me. Like they said, I was ate up, so that’s exactly what I planned to do. Ride my first century in Georgetown, KY in the 2007 Horsey Hundred!

 

Keep in mind, just because you may be “ate up” about something, doesn’t mean you’re an instant pro. As the weather began to cooperate, I began to ride my bike, every chance I had. However, I truly had no idea how to properly train for a century ride. The longest day of GABRAKY was 89 miles, so I just assumed that I had another 11 in me, surely. Well my journey over those hundred miles, my first century proved to me that those 11 more miles were a full season ago. I was not yet in good riding shape, not like I was at the end of my first season.

 

A few lessons I learned on my first century ride: once you complete your first, you will have the confidence that anything is possible on your bike; take advantage of the rest stops, they can be the difference between success and failure; the better you train before the ride, the easier it will be on game-day; sometimes you will need to stay with your friends to pull them along, because there will times when you need them to be there for you.

 

I took off on the century route for the 30th anniversary Horsey Hundred in May 2007 with my good friend Ed, and he told me early, “We’ll follow the century arrows, and when the 3/4  century route splits, we’ll decide how far we’re going.” I thought, “yeah we’re doing the 100 no matter what.” We set out pretty strong and I was on cloud nine as we ruled the rural roads of north central Kentucky, surrounded by tons of cyclists of all shapes and sizes, riding all types of bikes, wearing all colors of spandex. At the first stop, I was ready to keep going, but taking Ed’s advice, we stopped briefly, refueled, and set back out. We actually skipped the second stop, because both of us still had plenty of water and thought we only had about 13 or so miles to the next stop (the official lunch stop). That proved to be a mistake, because the lunch stop was actually about twenty miles away, the heat was starting to set in, and the hills were beginning to take a toll on my legs. Numerous times I would catch Ed looking back to make sure I was still there, and occasionally slowing up to wait on me. As we pulled into the lunch rest stop, I was whipped, and actually thought to myself, I’m not sure I’ll make it. Again, I heeded to my friend’s advice and got some fuel, then he saved my life (well actually he saved my ride), and said “I’m going to lay down in the shade for a minute. If I fall asleep, wake me up when you’re ready to roll.” That half hour nap under a shade tree proved to be my saving grace.

 

We saddled up and took back off with plenty of others, but shortly after starting back, we were separated from most of the crowd as the majority of riders complete shorter routes. We cruised along at a pretty good pace for the last forty miles across some beautiful scenery with rolling acres of horse fields lined by wood plank fences (a bluegrass region staple). We enjoyed conversation with ourselves, and I had caught my second wind, thanks to a little rest. I have had similar experiences on some century rides since that first one, in fact,I can vividly recall a heck of a challenge it was to complete the “Wheels O’ Fire Century Cycle” ride in Georgia in the early spring in 2010, which happens to be the first century ride that Renaissance Man completed. It all depends on how hard I train leading up to an event. It’s true, every time. The more you suffer before the “big ride,” the easier that ride will be. Promise.

 

I am doing a little suffering right now, as I’m planning a big year in cycling. First I will ride in the Redbud Century ride in London, which is the first of four centuries I plan to complete in the Kentucky Century Cycling Challenge. Next, I plan to ride in the Assault on Mt. Mitchell in South and North Carolina, then back to where it all started for Horsey Hundred in Georgetown. Into the summer, I have several rides on the agenda. All with the knowledge in the back of mind: either suffer now, or suffer later, but it’s always worth it, if it’s on the bike!

*Masher

 

 

Old KY Home Tour 2013
Sep 2013 25

The My Old KY Home Tour, an annual bicycling event hosted by the Louisville Bike Club, was the fourth and final chance to complete the innagural century challenge sponsored by Adventure Tourism KY. Some numbers from the century challenge: nearly 560 riders signed up, around half accomplished the challenge by completing 3 of the 4 century rides, and only 34 completed all 4. My good friend Chris Schmidt and I were 2 of those 34, while the Renaissance Man was able to finish his first century of the year at OKHT!

 

The ride began in Louisville and departed from E. P. Tom Sawyer State Park, heading southwest towards it’s finish point in historic Bardstown. The weather was very nice for a day to spend on the bike as it started with little humidity in the 70s, however it would rise through the day to a scorching low 90s as we found the toughest stretch of the ride, the last fifteen miles. The LBC offers three distances of 50, 70, or 102 on day one, with the option to camp and ride back to Louisville on Sunday on a 50 mile route or you can make your own arrangements for a pick up. I had planned to stay in Bardstown with good friend Chuck Allran and ride back on day two, but after listening to my bottom bracket snap, crackle, and pop all day long (and maybe hurting a little), I gladly took the pick up offer from my very gracious sister and brother-in-law Charlsie and Jamie Garrett. My hurting was mostly self inflicted from poor ride prep, but that happens sometimes.

 

My starting group consisted of Tim, Chuck, Chris, Toby, Becca, and Ann and we rolled out around 9am. We all hung together for about the first ten miles as we got warmed up then it split up a little over the rollers of the next section. The road marking leaving Louisville was eventful itself, but it did get better, especially after the “lunch stop” at mile 36 when the routes separated. From there on, the rest stops became fewer but the road marking was much better. It seemed like around four stops available up to the lunch stop, not sure because we only stopped once, but the meal was very nicely served at a Catholic church community by some Boy Scouts and friends. I normally won’t eat a full meal on a ride, and I would have preferred to have a lunch stop past halfway but I enjoyed half a chicken salad sammie and some power-aide to drink. I understand the meal was so early because of the way the routes stay together up to that point.

 

As we rolled out from there, our group was feeling strong and we attacked the next 20 – 30 miles, I don’t really remember any groups passing us. There was another rest stop at mile 50 and we skipped it because everyone still had plenty of water, not realizing the next stop would be some 28 miles later. So there were five stops, maybe more, through mile 50, then 2 for the last 50 … I’d recommend some type of change there. The entire route was beautiful, as much of cycling in the bluegrass state always is, and the last fifteen miles of this ride was probably the toughest stretch of the day with the climbing involved and the hottest part of the day. Earlier in the ride on the stretch just after lunch, I felt like I could pull my group strong to the finish, or even drop them. But when we ran low on water and had to conserve for many miles, it took a toll on my energy level. Thankfully, we found a farm hydrant along a country road and some very pleasant gentlemen graciously allowed us to refill our bottles. From that point on, it was the two Ironmen (Chris and Toby) who set the pace and eventually dropped me. Their level of endurance amazes me, I have learned by riding with them this year that they don’t try to kill a ride early, but they finish strong! And sometimes get off the bike and go running for good measure.

 

I simply couldn’t hang with them and Jamen, a Lexington cyclist we picked up along the way, over the last 8 miles which including the climbing section along the infamous Pottershop Rd. I did get to finish with some familiar faces, however, as I found several folks from Bluegrass Cycling Club (my local group ride) that had started a little earlier than us. Another Ironman (ironmom) Courtney pushed me the last couple miles to the finish where a celebration festival was in full force. There was a BBQ meal, music, a bike raffle for the Red Cross, and much more. Overall, it was a very nice day, despite some of the suffering I endured. Any time I get to ride my bike with some of my best friends is always a good day.

 

I think the ride was well organized, although for a long standing ride, I think they could benefit from a few changes. All of the volunteers were great as always. Huge thanks to all who helped, we couldn’t enjoy it nearly as much without you! Thanks to Louisville Bike Club for hosting the event, I’m glad I finally completed this ride, and thanks to Adventure Tourism for hosting the century challenge, I’m especially glad I accepted the challenge and look forward to receiving my cycling jersey! As far as the bike issue goes, it was somewhat normal wear and tear. The bottom bracket has been replaced by Pedal Power bike shop in Lexington, and is ready for another century ride. And since I felt a little guilty about not riding on day two with Chuck, I decided to donate blood when I saw the bloodmobile at church that morning. I would recommend the Old KY Home Tour bicycling event to any cyclist that enjoys road cycling, since it is later in the season, all riders have a chance to train and complete the route that best suits them. If any event planner would like to hear my opinion on the changes I would recommend, feel free to contact me through our site here and I’ll gladly help. Kudos once again to LBC and the entire OKHT team. Hope to see you next year!

 

*masher

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